rachelulgado:

A thing I made in Processing for the Coursera course, “Creative Programming for Digital Media and Mobile Applications.” I used the lecturers’ framework for audio data analysis, which includes some functionality for basic beat detection. I found it difficult to tweak to a point where I thought it looked decent. Learning a little more everyday. I was pretty happy with how this turned out. More information in the video description.

At the time I was reading stuff by Michio Kaku/thinking about multiverses for some reason and listening to this Kygo remix of Angels by the XX on repeat… so I guess this is what happened. 

(via luxarchitek)

(Source: insprd, via buromarks)

hifructosemag:

likeafieldmouse:

Sarah Schönfeld - All You Can Feel

"Since the 1950s, we in the western world have increasingly come to understand our most intimate desires and experiences as the products of a so-called ‘chemical self’. We can explain moods, angers and diseases both physiological and psychological as an imbalance of substances in the body.

All of this, of course, takes place against the backdrop of a constantly shifting legal and political climate regarding the regulation of different types of mood-altering substances.

What do all these substances actually look like when their essence is visually depicted?

Schönfeld squeezed drops of various legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures onto negative film which had
already been exposed. Each drop altered the coating of the film.

Much like the effect of some of these substances on humans, this can be a lengthy process – sometimes one that can barely be stopped.

She then enlarged these negatives including the chemical reaction of the particular drug, to sizes of up to 160 x 200cm.”

1. Valium

2. Ketamine

3. Speed

4. Crystal Meth

5. Solian

6. Magic

7. Orphiril

8. Pharmaceutical Speed

9. Dopamine 

10. Cocaine

The literal negative effects of drugs (on negatives)

(via notational)

subtilitas:

TMA - MR house, Beja 2009. Via, photos (C) Fernando Guerra

inspirationuberalles:

Keynote does Material Design (Vertical Comparison) from Andrew Haskin on Vimeo.

I was pretty excited about Google’s debut of Material Design, especially the video they made to promote it. I took it on as a challenge to recreate (most of) it using Keynote, and I thought I’d share a side-by-side comparison.

For those of you who don’t know, I’m a huge advocate of using Keynote in my work. I think most people underestimate this what used to be $20 software (now free with Mavericks!). In my work, there’s constant discussion about which is the best and hottest new design tool to use. I’ve tried many of them, but in the end I still keep coming back to Keynote. It’s easy to learn and use, swapping assets is a breeze (using media placeholder), and most complex animations can be tested with Magic Move (the secret sauce to it all). Producing animations can span a range of fidelities; I can produce all the assets in Keynote, or I can copy out of Illustrator or drag and drop from Sketch (how seamless this works puts a smile on my face every time). As an interaction or visual designer, if you’re not using Keynote to test and bring your work to life, then I think you should start now! At least I hope this little experiment inspires you to try.

The fidelity of the animation is nothing like what After Effects would do, but it’s pretty close and definitely gets the job done. To be honest, it’s not a raw export from Keynote. I did edit it in FCP X to match Google’s version with the music (I think I actually spent more time matching in FCP X than actually producing the animations in Keynote).

The assets you see I just screen grabbed from the original video. I didn’t reproduce them, but you might begin to see how you would copy in assets from another application.

Update: Here is a link to the Keynote file. app.box.com/s/q06fnhk09asgvx94a5gy

"学ばない人は、学ぶ人に使われる。仕事を創り出さない人は、創った人の仕事をやらされる。"

名言ランキング~Twitterで本の名言を共有~InBook.jp (via usaginobike) (via kyohei1989) (via kojiroby) (via plus16hours) (via tokunoriben)

policymic:

Happy π Day!

14 beautiful images that will show you how math is art

Follow policymic

(Source: micdotcom, via usaginobike)

Apple Back to School Windows
Apple Stores, Worldwide,

Using old “technology” to promote new technology, this window display features no digital devices. Instead, 85,000 pencils No. 2 yellow pencils are hand-stacked with erasers out. The pencils are molded into the words “iPad” and “Mac,” creating a metaphor that Apple products are as essential to students today as pencils were to students of yesteryear. The pencils are displayed before a backlit “ruled paper” backdrop with the message “Master every subject,” providing a simple but effective message to entice back-to-school shoppers.

Design/Retailer Apple, Cupertino, CA.

(Source: aredesignawards.com)

Apple: Back to School Window
162 Apple Stores

This simple, yet striking visual presentation features a molded, large-format replica iPod touch and iPod nanos created from vacuum-formed plastic with integrated video features. A single sheet board-printed, 8-ft. by 12-ft. “chalkboard” lexan panel conveys the back-to-school message, while the iPod nanos featured light boxes and the iPod touch had integrated functioning video displays.

Photography Circe Photo LLC, New York, NY.
Retailer/Visual Elements Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA.
Visual Elements ColorEdge - Retail Visual Group, New York, NY.
Visual Elements Delphi Productions, Alameda, CA.

Apple: Back to School Window
162 Apple Stores

This simple, yet striking visual presentation features a molded, large-format replica iPod touch and iPod nanos created from vacuum-formed plastic with integrated video features. A single sheet board-printed, 8-ft. by 12-ft. “chalkboard” lexan panel conveys the back-to-school message, while the iPod nanos featured light boxes and the iPod touch had integrated functioning video displays.

Photography Circe Photo LLC, New York, NY.
Retailer/Visual Elements Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA.
Visual Elements ColorEdge - Retail Visual Group, New York, NY.
Visual Elements Delphi Productions, Alameda, CA.

(Source: aredesignawards.com)

Tull Lamp
Designed by Tommaso Caldera, Tull is a reinterpretation of classical workshop lamps, wherein the light source is protected by a wire netting attached to the metal diffuser.

(Source: domusweb.it)

thedsgnblog:

Mariann Veress    |    http://behance.net/mariannveress

"School project: Simple Soap packaging."

Mariann is a student based in Budapest, Hungary. She is focused on graphic design, packaging, branding and print design.

The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

(Source: nicholasgurewitch, via olvidare)

staff:

whitehouse:

President Obama is answering your questions on education and college affordability in his first-ever Tumblr Q&A today.

Tune in right here at 4 p.m. ET, and make sure to follow us @whitehouse.

It’s really happening!

Stuff I like

→ See more stuff I like