buromarks:

http://afom.com.au/work/waffee

(Source: buromarks, via buromarks)

(Source: andrewgarybeardsall, via buromarks)

flatstudio:

Nourished Journal One

Single Edition: Ships late August

Nourished Journal is a bi-annual lifestyle publication. The aim of Nourished Journal is not only to create an inspiring publication, but also to be a platform for readers and contributors alike to share, learn and connect. The journal features interviews with inspiring individuals, uplifting and informative editorial, recipes, travel stories and practical information on health and wellbeing. We believe in taking a holistic view on life, which you will see reflected throughout the journal. 

Some of the features in Edition One include actor Shiva Rose, edible flowers recipes, Lauri Kranz from Edible Gardens LA, how to make fermented foods, a yoga breakdown, Strala Yoga founder Tara Stiles, director Kinga Burza, travel from Byron Bay to Utah, our guide to Los Angeles, and five minutes with designer Jenni Kayne.

Made Publishers — Nourished Journal One

(Source: nirtober, via buromarks)

buromarks:

http://tillwiedeck.com/2013/06/stefanie-klopf/

(Source: buromarks)

thedsgnblog:

Tung    |    http://madebytung.com

"Ryuji Mitani is a renowned contemporary woodworker from Japan. His wood tableware has been exhibited in countless galleries and museums all over Japan and abroad. His solo exhibition at Toronto design shop Mjölk, was his first North American exhibition. The mini brochure designed for the exhibition unfolds, doubling as a commemorative poster."

Tung is a Toronto-based studio specializing in graphic design and art direction within the fields of art, culture and commerce. Founded in 2014 by Emily Tu and Edmond Ng, their practice developed out of a shared desire to create honest, intelligent and beautifully crafted work. They take a grounded and considered approach to design. Their process is decidedly personal – they collaborate with their clients to create thoughtful and compelling responses that reflect their needs and values.

The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

betype:

Precious Sans Two by G-Type.

Precious Sans Two is a complete reworking of the 2002 design which was only ever available in PostScript format. Over a decade later G-Type’s Nick Cooke decided to re-appraise the typeface, scrutinise the old letterforms and overhaul the family. 
Make no mistake though, Precious Sans Two is no rudimentary re-release; nearly every character has been redrawn, re-proportioned, respaced and improved. 
Precious Sans Two is now in cross-platform compatible OpenType format with extended Latin language support for Western & Central Europe, the Baltics & Turkey. 
The original quirkier glyphs (f, g, I) have been retained as an OT style set feature and the typeface now contains small caps and an extensive set of discretionary ligatures as well as both proportional & tabular figures. 
The character set is further enhanced with the addition of 20 directional single and double arrows in each of the six weights which range from Thin through to Black, all with accompanying italics. 
Precious Sans Two is a distinctively modern typeface, well equipped for advanced typographic use in print, web and digital publishing environments.

Download it here: http://myfonts.us/YpuiOD

MICROGARDEN

MICROGARDEN

(Source: The Dieline)

— Borealica
Corporate branding

http://www.anagrama.com/portafolio/182-borealica

rachelulgado:

A thing I made in Processing for the Coursera course, “Creative Programming for Digital Media and Mobile Applications.” I used the lecturers’ framework for audio data analysis, which includes some functionality for basic beat detection. I found it difficult to tweak to a point where I thought it looked decent. Learning a little more everyday. I was pretty happy with how this turned out. More information in the video description.

At the time I was reading stuff by Michio Kaku/thinking about multiverses for some reason and listening to this Kygo remix of Angels by the XX on repeat… so I guess this is what happened. 

(via luxarchitek)

(Source: insprd, via buromarks)

hifructosemag:

likeafieldmouse:

Sarah Schönfeld - All You Can Feel

"Since the 1950s, we in the western world have increasingly come to understand our most intimate desires and experiences as the products of a so-called ‘chemical self’. We can explain moods, angers and diseases both physiological and psychological as an imbalance of substances in the body.

All of this, of course, takes place against the backdrop of a constantly shifting legal and political climate regarding the regulation of different types of mood-altering substances.

What do all these substances actually look like when their essence is visually depicted?

Schönfeld squeezed drops of various legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures onto negative film which had
already been exposed. Each drop altered the coating of the film.

Much like the effect of some of these substances on humans, this can be a lengthy process – sometimes one that can barely be stopped.

She then enlarged these negatives including the chemical reaction of the particular drug, to sizes of up to 160 x 200cm.”

1. Valium

2. Ketamine

3. Speed

4. Crystal Meth

5. Solian

6. Magic

7. Orphiril

8. Pharmaceutical Speed

9. Dopamine 

10. Cocaine

The literal negative effects of drugs (on negatives)

(via notational)

subtilitas:

TMA - MR house, Beja 2009. Via, photos (C) Fernando Guerra

inspirationuberalles:

Keynote does Material Design (Vertical Comparison) from Andrew Haskin on Vimeo.

I was pretty excited about Google’s debut of Material Design, especially the video they made to promote it. I took it on as a challenge to recreate (most of) it using Keynote, and I thought I’d share a side-by-side comparison.

For those of you who don’t know, I’m a huge advocate of using Keynote in my work. I think most people underestimate this what used to be $20 software (now free with Mavericks!). In my work, there’s constant discussion about which is the best and hottest new design tool to use. I’ve tried many of them, but in the end I still keep coming back to Keynote. It’s easy to learn and use, swapping assets is a breeze (using media placeholder), and most complex animations can be tested with Magic Move (the secret sauce to it all). Producing animations can span a range of fidelities; I can produce all the assets in Keynote, or I can copy out of Illustrator or drag and drop from Sketch (how seamless this works puts a smile on my face every time). As an interaction or visual designer, if you’re not using Keynote to test and bring your work to life, then I think you should start now! At least I hope this little experiment inspires you to try.

The fidelity of the animation is nothing like what After Effects would do, but it’s pretty close and definitely gets the job done. To be honest, it’s not a raw export from Keynote. I did edit it in FCP X to match Google’s version with the music (I think I actually spent more time matching in FCP X than actually producing the animations in Keynote).

The assets you see I just screen grabbed from the original video. I didn’t reproduce them, but you might begin to see how you would copy in assets from another application.

Update: Here is a link to the Keynote file. app.box.com/s/q06fnhk09asgvx94a5gy

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